Yoga for Begginners Part 2

Prasarita Padottanasana is eventually a resting pose, although when learning the pose, a lot of effort is involved in achieving a good posture, especially for those of us with tight hamstrings.   But eventually the pose becomes more effortless, quieting, and soothing and is often given as a prescription for anxiety and nervousness.   Prasarita Padottanasana can also be used as a
preparation or even a substitute for Sirsasana for those who cannot do
Sirsasana.   The word Prasarita should be pronounced more like praSArita (though
generally there is little accent placed on any syllables in Sanskrit words) —
don’t mispronounce Prasarita like “margarita” with an accent on the
“i.”

Malasana

Garland Pose – Malasana

To do this posture press your elbows against your inner knees, bringing your palms to together in Anjali Mudra (Salutation Seal), and resist the knees into the elbows. This will help lengthen your front torso.

To go further, press your inner thighs against the sides of your torso. Reach your arms forward, then swing them out to the sides and notch your shins into your armpits. Press your finger tips to the floor, or reach around the outside of your ankles and clasp your back heels.

Hold the position for 30 seconds to 1 minute, then inhale, straighten the knees, and stand into Uttanasana.

Squat with your feet as close together as possible. (Keep your heels on the floor if you can; otherwise, support them on a folded mat.)

Separate your thighs slightly wider than your torso. Exhaling, lean your torso forward and fit it snugly between your thighs.

Press your elbows against your inner knees, bringing your palms to together in Anjali Mudra (Salutation Seal), and resist the knees into the elbows. This will help lengthen your front torso.

To go further, press your inner thighs against the sides of your torso. Reach your arms forward, then swing them out to the sides and notch your shins into your armpits. Press your finger tips to the floor, or reach around the outside of your ankles and clasp your back heels.  Hold the position for 30 seconds to 1 minute, then inhale, straighten the knees, and stand into Uttanasana.

Cobbler’s Pose – Baddha Konasana

bringing the soles of the feet together and letting the knees fall out to either side.

2. Keep the spine long.

3. Press the outer edges of the feet together strongly.

Beginners: Take padding under the sit bones if necessary. Position a block under each knee for support if necessary.

balasana

Balasana

(bah-LAHS-anna)
bala = child

Kneel on the floor. Touch your big toes together and sit on your heels, then separate your knees about as wide as your hips.

Exhale and lay your torso down between your thighs. Broaden your sacrum across the back of your pelvis and narrow your hip points toward the navel, so that they nestle down onto the inner thighs. Lengthen your tailbone away from the back of the pelvis while you lift the base of your skull away from the back of your neck.

Lay your hands on the floor alongside your torso, palms up, and release the fronts of your shoulders toward the floor. Feel how the weight of the front shoulders pulls the shoulder blades wide across your back.

Balasana is a resting pose. Stay anywhere from 30 seconds to a few minutes. Beginners can also use Balasana to get a taste of a deep forward bend, where the torso rests on the thighs. Stay in the pose from 1 to 3 minutes. To come up, first lengthen the front torso, and then with an inhalation lift from the tailbone as it presses down and into the pelvis

About dkpilates

Pilates Instructor, Yoga Instructor, Personnel trainer and Group Fitness Instructor. Don teaches Contemporary and the Authentic forms of Pilates, in the later 90's, Don began his study of Yoga. His study of Yoga includes the Hatha, Iyengar, Bikram, and Astanga disciplines. His other areas of interest in fitness include Martial Arts, Spin, Boot Camp Training, and Weight Training. Don has extensive training and certifications from AFFA, IDEA, MadDog, B-Fit and Polestar. Don Continues his of Pilates education with Michelle Larson in Santa Fe New Mexico. His personal philosophy related to fitness is to aid students in a personalized balance of strength, stamina and flexibility. He is dedicated to design a program specifically for his students independent of the season of their life to create functional movement and help them reach their fitness goals.
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